www.fayettevillehistory.com > Reed Family

A pile of photographs from the 18th and early 19th century, all related to the Reed family of Fayetteville, was spotted in a dumpster by Dixie Rhyne, who retrieved them and was kind enough to allow publication of the photos on the Fayetteville History website. The Reed family — George Washington Reed and Mary Jane Ferguson Reed — bought the Wilson home in the 600 block of Fayetteville’s West Dickson Street prior to the Civil War and settled in for the next century. Mr. Reed was a successful merchant, councilman, postmaster and circuit clerk. They had seven children: Maggie, John Alois, Lina Xantha, George Jr., James Lafayette “Fay,” William L., and Maude F. Reed, most of whom attended the university, either in its preparatory school or as college students. A couple of photos also depict the next generation as well.

Van Winkle and Reeds

Van Winkle and Reeds

From left, Lee Van Winkle, Lina X. Reed and John Alois Reed in an undated photo by F.W. Guerin of St. Louis.


Clifton Reed

Clifton Reed

Clifton Reed at age 2 was the son of John Alois Reed and Lena Bates Reed.


Grandsons with Pony Cart

Grandsons with Pony Cart

A photo dated August 26, 1901, shows brothers Norman Bates Reed and John Alois Reed Jr. sitting in a cart drawn by their pony, Sparkle. The view is from the back yard of their house at 304 N. College looking south across Dickson Street. Barely visible through the trees is the Baxter House, which stood where the modern Washington County Courthouse now stands. The two boys are the sons of John Alois Reed Sr. and Lena Bates Reed, and grandsons of George Washington Reed and Mary Jane Reed.


John A. Reed

John A. Reed

John A. Reed wears the uniform of a member of the Baldwin Commandery No. 4 of the Knights Templar in an 1893 or 1894 photograph.


John A. Reed

John A. Reed

John Alois Reed in March 1882 at St. Louis.


John A. Reed

John A. Reed

Although undated and unidentified, this photograph appears to be John A. Reed Sr. at a later age, probably in the early 20th century.


Lena Bates Reed

Lena Bates Reed

Lena Bates Reed, the wife of John A. Reed shown with a parasol in an undated photograph.


Mary Jane Ferguson Reed

Mary Jane Ferguson Reed

Mary Jane Ferguson Reed as photographed by the Gannaway studio in Fort Smith in April 1898.


Four from Fayetteville

Four from Fayetteville

Standing, Frank Coffey, left, and Fay Reed; sitting, William Reed, left, and Wallace Ferguson. The Reeds and Fergusons had been business connections in Fayetteville throughout the latter half of the 19th century. The undated photo was taken by S.W. Spangler of Carthage, Mo.


Reeds

Reeds

Lina X. Reed, back left, and Lena Bates Reed, back right stand behind an unidentified person, left, John A. Reed in this undated tintype.


George Reed Sr. and John A. Reed

George Reed Sr. and John A. Reed

A glass-plate photograph made through the collodion process shows George W.M. Reed Sr. with eldest son, John Alois Reed, about 1868. The elder Reed was a merchant and served as city councilman, postmaster and circuit clerk. The younger Reed followed his father into the mercantile business before later becoming a traveling salesman.


Costume Party

Costume Party

John Alois Reed, left, and Lee Van Winkle don outfits of velvet and feathered plumes depicting cavaliers for a costume party in 1881.


Lee Van Winkle and John Alois Reed

Lee Van Winkle and John Alois Reed

Lee Van Winkle, left, and John Alois Reed dressed in matching nautical attire for an undated photo by Mrs. S.J. Young.


George, William and Lina Reed

George, William and Lina Reed

George W.M. Reed Jr., William L. Reed and Lina X. Reed, undated, but taken by a studio in Los Angeles, Calif.


Lina Reed and Lena Reed

Lina Reed and Lena Reed

Lina Xantha Reed, seated, and her sister-in-law, Lena Bates Reed pose for a photograph in 1881 taken by Mrs. S.J. Young.


George W.M. Reed Jr.

George W.M. Reed Jr.

George W.M. Reed Jr. is pictured in 1897 in a dapper tweed suit with watch fob and a Stetson in hand.


Fay Reed with Bicycle

Fay Reed with Bicycle

James Lafayette "Fay" Reed with his ordinary bicycle, better known now as a "penny-farthing" because of the large difference in size between the front and rear wheels. With matching knickers and shirt, a polka-dot bow tie and a smoker's cap, Reed was the epitome of the late 19th century bicycle craze.