www.fayettevillehistory.com > Historic Homes of Fayetteville

In 1951, Walter J. Lemke photographed a dozen homes in Fayetteville that he considered historic and made it a baker's dozen by adding a picture and description of the Masonic Hall. Although most of the buildings are still standing, several have since been torn down.

Rieff House

Rieff House

Henry Rieff built this house in the 1850s on West Center Street. Today it is used as Moore's Funeral Chapel. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Walker-Knerr-Williams House

Walker-Knerr-Williams House

Judge David Walker built this house after the Civil War on the site of an earlier home built by Matthew Leeper. Walker's daughter, Mary and her husband, James D. Walker, then lived in the house till their deaths. Carl and Inez Knerr then bought the house, and it later passed into the Williams family. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Davidson House

Davidson House

Built by his parents in 1859, B.R. Davidson and his wife, Rebecca Stirman Trott, lived in this house on 10 acres until their deaths. The house is still standing just north of the intersection of Davidson Street and Washington Avenue. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Gunter House

Gunter House

Built by Thomas Montague Gunter and his second wife, Jennie, built this house on East Maple Street sometime after the Civil War. It is still standing although the grounds have been broken up with other homes. After being used as apartments in the 1970s and 1980s, it has been restored to a single-family residence. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Reed House

Reed House

Started by Alf Wilson about 1851, the house was bought by George W.M. and Mary Jane Ferguson Reed in 1868. It stood on West Dickson Street about where the north end of the UARK Bowl is today and served as a fraternity house in its latter days. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Masonic Hall

Masonic Hall

The Masonic Hall was erected about 1840 by the Washington Lodge of the Masons on a lot deeded by Governor Archibald Yell. It stood at the northwest corner of Rock Street and Block Avenue, often serving as a meeting place for newly formed schools and churches until they could acquire their own buildings. It was razed in 1963. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Quesenbury House

Quesenbury House

William Quesenbury, editor and publisher of the South-West Independent, built a house on what would become Duncan Avenue. It later was home to Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill, third president of the Arkansas Industrial University, now named the University of Arkansas. A marker on the street commemorates its location. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Walker-Stone House

Walker-Stone House

Built in 1847 for Judge David Walker, the north side of the building facing Center Street was originally the back side. Its southern facade looked out on the Fayetteville Female Seminary, which Walker helped found. Stephen K. Stone bought the house in 1850s. Today it is used as law offices. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Waxhaws

Waxhaws

Built in 1836 by Arkansas's first congressman and second governor, Archibald Yell, Waxhaws stood on a little hill on South College Avenue, approximately where the Fayetteville Senior Center is today. Efforts to save the building were unsuccessful and it was torn down so that a newer house could be built. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Tebbetts House

Tebbetts House

The Tebbetts House was built in 1853 for Matilda and Jonas March Tebbetts as their family home in Fayetteville. It became known as Headquarters House because both Union and Confederate forces used the house as headquarters during the Civil War. Its front door (now moved to an interior door frame) still bears the scars of the Battle of Fayetteville. Today, the house is owned by the Washington County Historical Society and is its headquarters. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Gregg House

Gregg House

Lafayette and Mary Shreve Gregg built this house by 1872 on the same site as a log cabin they had built in 1853. Lafayette Gregg, who championed establishment of the University of Arkansas and construction of Old Main, likely built the house of bricks fired at the same as those for Old Main, which is just up the hill. As of 2009, the house was still in family hands. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Stirman House

Stirman House

The Stirman House, built by Erasmus Stirman just after the Civil War, stood on College Avenue just north of the First Christian Church. Annie Duke Futrall and her husband, University of Arkansas President John C. Futrall, lived in the house during the better part of the 20th century. The house was razed in the 1960s for a car lot. Today, the Washington County Courthouse is on the site. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)


Wilson House

Wilson House

The Wilson House was built about 1868 on the site of an earlier home built by Alf M. Wilson. The earlier home provided refuge to the Wilson family during the Battle of Fayetteville, but it burned during the latter stages of the Civil War. The pictured house was home to at least six generations of Wilson family members, including Robert J. Wilson and Allan M. Wilson. Today, the Pi Phi sorority house stands on the site. (Photo by Walter J. Lemke)